• Jay David Bolter, author of our book, Writing Space, coined the term "Late Age of Print" in 1991. Jill Walker Rettberg, author of Blogging, furthered that statement by saying that now, "we may well be on our way out of the Age of Print, late or otherwise" (Rettberg 42).
  • Rettberg also argues in her chapter "From Bards to Blogs" that "the ascendancy of print is waning...and is not longer the dominant cultural medium" (44). Rettberg credits this to radio and television moving in on print during the late twentieth century.

"Writing in the Late Age of Print," Chapter 1, Bolter
  • The late age of print word processing, databases, email, the Internet, and computer graphics are displacing pring communication
  • It is possible in this age for some texts never to be printed, but to just be in digital form
  • The Internet has made digital communication expand, there are websites that have tons of literature, fiction, articles, online magazines, online newspapers, etc (all not printed)
  • Electronic technology makes the range of possibilities in writing even greater than with print
  • Now the printed book has rivals, not just electronic media, but also visual
  • The idea of the book is changing in the late age of print
  • There is a tension between print and digital forms
  • The idea of the book has been challenged before the late age of print by people, but now there is actually proof that the book can be challenged by technology because now the computer exists
  • We no longer rely on print exclusively for writing
  • Before the late age of print, we saw writing as an "unchanging artifact," but now that is not as true