Taken from Rettberg's Blogging, Chapter Two: "Orality and Literacy"
  • Prior to broadcast media and the Internet, two major shifts in the communication field included the introduction of writing and the introduction of print (32).
  • People had mixed feelings regarding writing; they were skeptic, yet excited (33).
  • Plato actually objected to writing things down:
    • He felt as though then people would not bother to memoriize facts. He thought writing would destroy our memory (33).
    • He also said that with oral communication, if you ask someone a question, they will be able to answer you. On the other hand, if someone has just written something down, the written text will not be able to communicate back with you or have an argument or discussion (33). The text will "preserve a solemn silence" (33, Plato 1999).
  • Plato wrote dialogues and praised dialogues as a more valuable form of communication than writing or public speeches. The web has a dialogic nature that is similarly praised. John Durham Peters disagrees with though, saying that "[d]ialogue is only one communicative script among many. The lament over the end of conversation and the call for refreshed dialogue alike miss the virtues inherent in nonreciprocal forms of action and culture." (34)
    • Dialogue has been seen as key features of new media, namely the Internet
    • Blogs are especially key for both dialogue and dissemination
  • What's good about the Internet and blogging, as opposed to text actually written, is that things such as blogs, are much easier to edit after posting (Rettberg 33-34). For example, after I post something, I can easily make a change if I realized that I made a grammatical error or one of my facts is incorrect.
  • If a blog is well-kept, meaning posted on often and very up-to-date, then it will not at all be like the "solemn silence" (Rettberg 33, Plato 1999) that the author mentions before. In fact, the utilization of the comment feature on blogs can create lots of dialogue between the blogger and those reading the blog (36).
  • Print will not completely disappear, but rather it's form will change. Print will no longer define the prganization and presentation of knowledge as it has for the past five centuries. The shift to electronic writing will make writing more fexible (Bolter 2).