http://personal.georgiasouthern.edu/~jwalker/MOO/index.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOO
  • MOO stands for MUD, Object-Oriented, and MUD stands for Multi-User Domain. Originally designed as a form of the Dungeons and Dragons game, developed for multi-users on the Internet, MUDs and MOOs have expanded and found a comfortable home in other forms fo gaming and education.
  • Specifically, a MOO is a text-based online virtual reality system to which multiple users (players) are connected at the same time.
  • MOOs are network accessible, multi-user, programmable, interactive systems used in the construction of text-based adventure games, conferencing systems, and other collaborative software. Their most common use is as multi-participant, low-bandwidth virtual realities.
  • A MUD (originally Multi-User Dungeon, with later variants Multi-User Dimension and Multi-User Domain) combines elements of role-playing games, hack and slash, interactive fiction, and online chat . Players can read or view depictions of rooms, objects, other players, non-player characters, and actions performed in the virtual world. Players typically interact with each other and the world by typing commands that resemble a natural language

Bolter, Chapter 6
  • "Educators have argued that MOOs, chat rooms, and threaded discussion groups offer students an opportunity for authentic exchange despite or even because of the fact that the student must type her messages at a keyboard and read them on the computer." (114)
  • Because of this, educators have created forms that use both hypertext and hypermedia for various subjects (ranging from only verbal, such as MOOs and chat rooms, to very visual, such as Web sites and hypermedia applications)
  • Some MOO programs (Ex: Daedalus) change the way class discussion can be held by making the class discussion be able to be held in electronic space in a "virtual room"
  • These programs normally compliment, not replace, face-to-face in-class discussion
  • Many in support of MOO programs feel as though these overcome the authority issue of a professor just lecturing to a group of students. Instead, everyone can converse freely and express ideas immediately.

  • Susan Barnes states that MUDs are "online games. They use software programs that accept multiple player connections over the network. The software gives each player access to a shared database of 'rooms', 'exits', and objects. Players navigate the database from 'inside' their rooms, and they see only the objects located in the particular room that they are in. Players move from room to room through the exits that connect the rooms. MUDs can be viewed as a type of virtual reality, or an electronically represented 'place' that can be visited."
  • Where MUDs are object oriented, MOOs add additional objects to the database, "such as rooms, exits, things, and notes. Moos support an embedded programming language that enables players to describe types of behavior of the objects they create. MOOS facilitate the creation of virtual reality objects that enable the user to experience different types of environments and locations.