• Web page can be "hot" - linking one page electronically to another page - the second web page can also contain linked phrases that lead the reader to other pages - can continue indefinitely
  • Network of interconnected writings
  • Hypertext- "creation and presentation of such hypertextual structures that seem to constitute a new form of writing" (Bolter 27)
  • Symbols- have meaning in words and have meaning as links
  • Hypertextual links serve many purposes:
    • make the structure of the site transparent
    • function like printed footnotes to provide additional info
    • take the reader to other websites to further explore related topics
  • Hypertext consists of units- pages, paragraphs, graphics -and the links between them
  • Hypertext is a network designed by the author, meant to be explored by the reader. Hypertext allows and invited the author to write with symbols - the words and structures are interactive in electronic space.
  • Every text must work through associations of sound--not just ideas.
  • Here is a site that has been described as "...the primary source for serious hypertext" by a New York Times Book reviewer: http://www.eastgate.com/.
    • Eastgate publishes original hypertext
    • This includes fiction, non-fiction, and poetry
    • The site also provides and creates tools for hypertext writers
    • Here is a link to one of the hypertext publications on Eastgate's website: "Patchwork Girl" by Shelley Jackson
  • HTML= HyperText Markup Language, and it is the code for writing a Web page that can be displayed in a Web browser.
    • For example, <p> at the beginning of a paragraph and </p> at the end of a paragraph, lets the browser know that the text between those two tags should be displayed as a separate paragraph.
  • CSS= Cascading Style Sheets and is the way of specifying how the Web browser should "style" or present pages that are marked up in HTML.
    • Numerous tutorials are available online about how to adjust HTML and CSS templates.