As described in Rettberg's Blogging, pages 22-30
  • World Wide Web was invented by Tim Berners-Lee and first implemented at the end of 1990
  • In 1993 the Web opened up to the general public with the release of Mosaic, the first widely available graphical web browser, and also the first Web browser to allow embedded images
  • By 1994, some pioneers had started online diaries (Justin Hall)
    • Hall's website is called links.net and is a good example of a blog that is never meant to be finished, but is ongoing
  • The term "weblog" was used in the early 1990's to refer to the log of visitors that a person who administers a Web server can see
  • First usage of the term "weblog" when referring to an online diary was used by Jorn Barger in 1997
    • the title of his site was Robot Wisdom: A weblog by Jorn Barger
  • In late 1998 and throughout 1999, several free tools appeared that allowed bloggers to easily publish and update blogs and online diaries using templates and Web based forms where posts could be typed straight in. (Early bloggers hand-coded their sites)
  • 1999 saw the launch of Pitas and Blogger
    • As stated by Rebecca Blood in 2000, these websites have given anyone the ability to create a blog. It is not necessary to know how to code a website with HTML anymore; anyone can share their voice on the Web
  • In 2002 the word "blog" was defined in the Oxford English Dictionary
  • Blog search engine Technorati.com launched in 2003
    • It went from 100,000 blogs tracked in late 2003 to over 3 million in July 2004
  • In 2003 the word "blog" was made the word of the year by Merriam-Webster
  • By 2007 Technorati tracked over 70 million weblogs
  • In 2004, 62% of Internet users still did not what a blog was (information through use of survey)
  • Today, impossible to know how many blogs there are
    • One reason for this is that there are a lot inactive blogs (people create a blog, but then never use it)
    • Another reason for this is "spam blogs" which are blogs created by spammers to confuse search engines
    • There is also no central place on the internet that counts blogs

  • Blogging was also known as "weblogging" since 1997.
  • Today blogs are expected to stay current and to be updated frequently, but websites were originally expected to be stable. Once they were completed, that was that. This led to many websites being "under construction" until all information was put in and the website was complete. This obviously no longer holds true as any website that were to not change would soon become obsolesced by newer and more updated blogs.