• Blogging is a part of history of communication and literacy, and emblematic of a shift from uni-directional mass media to participatory media, where viewers and readers become creators of media--blogging is a participatory form of media
  • Some king of log kept on the Web
  • A website where entries are written in chronological order and commonly displayed in reverse chronological order (Wikipedia)
  • A frequently updated Website consisting of dated entries arranged in reverse chronological order so the most recent post appears first (Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory)
  • A frequently updated Website consisting of personal observations, excerpts from other sources, etc., typically run by a single person, and usually with hyperlinks to other sites; an online journal or diary (Oxford English Dictionary)
  • A personal website, of sorts, maintained by one (or more) person(s) kept for personal interest, hobby, or work related experience.
  • A social medium that is generally written in the first person (Rettberg 21)
  • Online diaries full of stories and external links made by people where others are allowed to comment, reflect, and respond to the happenings of that specific blog, allowing them to be followed and understood over a period
  • Blogs are both a form of narrative and a form of self-representation
  • the word blog is literally a "contraction of the words Web and log"
    • the word "log" refers to a record of events
  • Can be defined as a medium or a genre, depending on your own perspective/opinion
    • Rettberg gives examples of genres and sub-genres of blogs: diary-style, filter, political, personal
  • Evan Williams, co-founder of the company that created Blogger.com, lists three characteristics that he thinks defines blogging: frequency. brevity, and personality (Rettberg 21)
  • Considering the fact that blogging is such a new medium (it was first used in 1997), it is ironic that the origins of the word come from nautical navigation. As explained in Rettberg (pgs. 17-18), "log" refers to a chronological record of events during a sea journey: tracking speed, weather, course, etc. This comes from when a sailor would determine speed by throwing a log attached to a rope overboard and counting how many knots passed through his hands in thirty seconds. Readings from the literal "log" would then be entered into the logbook.
    • Blogs today still possess the chronological information of the logbook, though they are much less ordered and obviously contain a lot more narrative and personal elements.
    • The term "weblogging" being based in navigation makes sense due to the fact that in the early days of the Internet people referred to it as "navigating the web."