• Types of dialogues in electronic writing:
    • dialogue between the writer and reader
    • dialogue between verbal and audiovisual modes of representation
    • -dialogue among various new and old media forms (ex: Web page, the essay, the textbook)
  • Levinson notes in his book New New Media that comments are a major means of dialogue on blogs
    • He calls comments "the most frequent form of sustained written discourse in the new new media world." This is true because anyone can comment on blogs (unless they are moderated) and open up a new line of discourse. Not only does it allow bloggers to converse with their readers, it allows readers to converse with other readers.
    • Comments are sustained because they exist as long as the blogger does not delete them. Your comment could be read a year after it's post date and still spark a new conversation
    • This brings up the question of moderating comments - should a blogger keep comments from appearing immediately in order to keep undesirable comments off of the blog? This may prevent the immediacy of the dialogue because it requires the blogger to accept the comments before they can appear and spark conversation
  • Commenting and dialogue on blogs comes in all different forms. Some is friendly, some is angry, some is critical, etc. Many bloggers form online relationships and personalities through their commenting back and forth with others, while others don't at all because they choose to post as "guest" or anonomously, or under a pseudonym.
  • Plato praised dialogues as "a form of communication more valuable than dissemination" (Rettberg 34).
  • John Durham Peters criticized how praised dialogue is, saying that "[d]ialogue is only one communicative script among many. The lament over the end of conversation and the call for refreshed dialogue alike miss the virtues inherent in nonreciprocal forms of action and culture" (34, taken from Peters 1999, 35).

[ Hypertextual Essay] - Bolter Chapter 8
    • The traditional form of academic essays has remained fairly unchanged even though the internet has grown to become one of the most popular forms of communication.
      • Research essays in a hypertextual form remain relatively rare on the internet.
      • Academic writing has stayed true to publication in journals or anthologies.
      • Academics seeking tenure or promotion are not publishing their research in new media.
      • However, there is an increasing number of individuals experimenting with new media.
      • Postmodern Culture is a fully electronic journal (jefferson.village.virginia.edu/pmc) that publushes online.
        • They present linear articles instead of presenting information in hypertext.
      • Scholars tend to be more likely to use multimedia as a supplement to illustrate issues.
        • Most forms are an accompanying CD-ROM or DVD
        • Rather than using hyperlinking to connect readers with the multimedia.
      • Bolter notes a significance that even debate over hypertext even occurs in print (both proponents and opponents of the new form (citing Birkets 1994; Miller, 1998; Slouka, 1995; and so on).
      • Even though proponents of hypertext have transferred their ideas and presentations to CD-ROM and the Web, they recognize that unfortunately it is necessary in order to a traditional academic audience.
      • Scholars in the humanities continue to regard print forms as authoritative (Bolter, 2001, p. 112).